Pivotal Motion

When it comes to physiotherapy services, Pivotal Motion has an impeccable understanding of what their customers, of all ages and abilities, need. It is an impressive combination of unrivalled industry knowledge, a customer centric focus and highly skilled and professional staff that has cemented Pivotal Motion Physiotherapy as a quality treatment provider.
Pivotal Motion Physiotherapy is at the Brisbane Volleyball Club presentation night #proudsponsors #pivotalmotion #volleyball

Pivotal Motion Physiotherapy is at the Brisbane Volleyball Club presentation night #proudsponsors #pivotalmotion #volleyball

Balance and Strength class @ Pivotal Motion Physio. The class worked hard today #proudphysio #ageisnotalimit  (at Pivotal Motion Physiotherapy)

Balance and Strength class @ Pivotal Motion Physio. The class worked hard today #proudphysio #ageisnotalimit (at Pivotal Motion Physiotherapy)

neuromorphogenesis:

What is Multiple Sclerosis?

Multiple sclerosis (MS), also known as disseminated sclerosis or encephalomyelitis disseminata, is an inflammatory disease in which the insulating covers of nerve cells (myelin) in the brain and spinal cord are damaged. Damage to myelin causes interference in the communication between your brain, spinal cord and other areas of your body. This condition may result in deterioration of the nerves themselves, a process that’s not reversible. MS takes several forms, with new symptoms either occurring in isolated attacks (relapsing forms) or building up over time (progressive forms). Between attacks, symptoms may go away completely; however, permanent neurological problems often occur, especially as the disease advances.

Symptoms

Symptoms of multiple sclerosis vary, depending on the location of affected nerve fibers. Multiple sclerosis symptoms may include:

  • Numbness or weakness in one or more limbs
  • Partial or complete loss of central vision, usually in one eye, often with pain during eye movement (optic neuritis)
  • Double vision or blurring of vision
  • Tingling or pain in parts of your body
  • Electric-shock sensations that occur with certain head movements
  • Tremor, lack of coordination or unsteady gait
  • Slurred speech
  • Fatigue
  • Dizziness

Heat sensitivity is common in people with multiple sclerosis. Small increases in body temperature can trigger or worsen multiple sclerosis symptoms.

Most people with multiple sclerosis, particularly in the beginning stages of the disease, experience relapses of symptoms, which are followed by periods of complete or partial remission of symptoms.

Some people have a benign form of multiple sclerosis. In this form of the disease, the condition remains stable and often doesn’t progress to serious forms of MS after the initial attack.

The Four Courses of Multiple Sclerosis

People with MS can typically experience one of four disease courses, each of which might be mild, moderate, or severe.

  • Relapsing-Remitting MS
    People with this type of MS experience clearly defined attacks of worsening neurologic function. These attacks—which are called relapses, flare-ups, or exacerbations —are followed by partial or complete recovery periods (remissions), during which no disease progression occurs. Approximately 85% of people are initially diagnosed with relapsing-remitting MS.
  • Primary-Progressive MS
    This disease course is characterized by slowly worsening neurologic function from the beginning—with no distinct relapses or remissions. The rate of progression may vary over time, with occasional plateaus and temporary minor improvements. Approximately 10% of people are diagnosed with primary-progressive MS.
  • Secondary-Progressive MS 
    Following an initial period of relapsing-remitting MS, many people develop a secondary-progressive disease course in which the disease worsens more steadily, with or without occasional flare-ups, minor recoveries (remissions), or plateaus. Before the disease-modifying medications became available, approximately 50% of people with relapsing-remitting MS developed this form of the disease within 10 years. Long-term data are not yet available to determine if treatment significantly delays this transition.
  • Progressive-Relapsing MS
    In this relatively rare course of MS (5%), people experience steadily worsening disease from the beginning, but with clear attacks of worsening neurologic function along the way. They may or may not experience some recovery following these relapses, but the disease continues to progress without remissions.

Since no two people have exactly the same experience of MS, the disease course may look very different from one person to another. And, it may not always be clear to the physician—at least right away—which course a person is experiencing.

What causes MS?

The major scientific theories about the causes of MS include the following:

Immunologic

It is now generally accepted that MS involves an immune-mediated process—an abnormal response of the body’s immune system that is directed against the myelin (the fatty sheath that surrounds and insulates the nerve fibers) in the central nervous system (CNS—the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves).

Environmental

MS is known tooccur more frequently in areas that are farther from the equator. Epidemiologists—scientists who study disease patterns—are looking at many factors, including variations in geography, demographics (age, gender, and ethnic background), genetics, infectious causes, and migration patterns, in an effort to understand why.

Genetics

MS is not considered a hereditary disease; however, a number of genetic variations have been shown to increase the risk. The probability is higher in relatives of an affected person, with a greater risk among those who are more closely related. In identical twins both are affected about 30% of the time, while around 5% for non-identical twins and 2.5% of siblings are affected with a lower percentage of half-siblings. If both parents are affected the risk in their children is 10 times that of the general population.

Treatment:

Although there is no known cure for multiple sclerosis, several therapies have proven helpful. The primary aims of therapy are returning function after an attack, preventing new attacks, and preventing disability.

Promoting Function through Rehabilitation

Rehabilitation programs focus on function—they are designed to help you improve or maintain your ability to perform effectively and safely at home and at work. Rehabilitation professionals focus on overall fitness and energy management, while addressing problems with accessibility and mobility, speech and swallowing, and memory and other cognitive functions.

The Role of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

CAM includes everything from exercise and diet to food supplements, stress management strategies, and lifestyle changes. These therapies come from various disciplines and traditions—yoga, hypnosis, relaxation techniques, traditional herbal healing, Chinese medicine, macrobiotics, naturopathy, and many others. They are referred to as complementary when they are used in conjunction with conventional medical treatments and alternative when they are used instead of conventional treatments.

Medications for Modifying the Disease Course

The following agents can reduce disease activity and disease progression for many individuals with relapsing forms of MS, including those with secondary progressive disease who continue to have relapses: Aubagio (teriflunomide) Avonex (interferon beta-1a) Betaseron (interferon beta-1b) Copaxone (glatiramer acetate) Extavia (interferon beta-1b) Gilenya (fingolimod) Novantrone (mitoxantrone) Rebif (interferon beta-1a) Tecfidera (dimethyl fumarate) Tysabri (natalizumab)

Sources: 1 2 3 4

(via thescienceofreality)

It’s back to school time! Correctly purchasing school shoes supports healthy growing feet. #schoolshoes #newmarketpodiatry (at Pivotal Motion)

It’s back to school time! Correctly purchasing school shoes supports healthy growing feet. #schoolshoes #newmarketpodiatry (at Pivotal Motion)

Scott’s back from holiday to take care of your feet #lovesfeet #podiatry #pivotalmotion

Scott’s back from holiday to take care of your feet #lovesfeet #podiatry #pivotalmotion

medicalschool:

World AIDS Day, December 1st

World AIDS Day, observed on 1 December every year, is dedicated to raising awareness of the AIDS pandemic caused by the spread of HIV infection. Government and health officials observe the day, often with speeches or forums on the AIDS topics.

Screenshots from Interactive World AIDS Day 2013 Infographic by CNN

Source: UK’s National AIDS Trust, WHO, UNAIDS, amfAR, CDC
EDITORIAL: BRYONY JONES

GRAPHIC: CNNI DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT

No copyright infringement intended, rights reserved to respective owners.

Best of luck our physio aid Isaac who had shoulder surgery this week. We have our fingers crossed that Isaac can transfer into physiotherapy from exercise science at UQ next year. 
#speedyrecovery
#thatsnothowtospendsummer

Best of luck our physio aid Isaac who had shoulder surgery this week. We have our fingers crossed that Isaac can transfer into physiotherapy from exercise science at UQ next year.
#speedyrecovery
#thatsnothowtospendsummer